CCR2 is a major receptor for chemokine expressed on monocytes. It activates through its ligands MCP1, MCP2, MCP3 or MCP4 stimulating monocyte migration across the vascular walls into tissues that facilitate chronic inflammation. CCR2 belongs to the GPCR1 family. 

Anti-CCR2 antibody is a multi-pass membrane protein that is found in cell membranes. It can also be found on monocytes and other types of cells. There are two forms of CCR2 that can be alternatively spliced, CCR2A, which is the major form expressed by mononuclear and vascular muscle cells.

CCR2B is expressed predominantly by monocytes. CCR2 is both pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory. It is mediated by regulatory T cell activities. It has been linked to inflammation and many other pathologies, including HIV-1 AIDS and cancer.

CCR2, a receptor for a chemokine, regulates monocyte/macrophage. It is also upregulated by inflammation. CCR2 polymorphisms may play a role in resistance to HIV-1 infection and delayed progression to AIDS. CCR2 polymorphisms may play a role in resistance to HIV-1 infection and delayed progression to AIDS.

MCP-1 activation may facilitate monocytic infiltration in tissues of rheumatoid, alveolitis, and tumour infiltration. Alternative splicing produces two isoforms. Alternative splicing can produce two CCR2 isoforms. In rheumatoid arthritis, CD3+ lymphocytes have shown an increase in CCR2 expression.